FATF Advisories and Guidance

September 14, 2020

Keep on top of the latest advisories and guidances from the FATF. This blog will be updated with any new information from the regulator as it becomes available.

Sept. 14, 2020 Red Flags of Money Laundering

The FATF has identified red flag indicators to help detect whether virtual assets are being used for criminal activity.

Virtual assets (VA) and related services have the potential to spur financial innovation and efficiency, but their distinct features also create new opportunities for money launderers, terrorist financiers, and other criminals to launder their proceeds or finance their illicit activities.

The ability to transact across borders rapidly not only allows criminals to acquire, move, and store assets digitally often outside the regulated financial system, but also to obfuscate the origin or destination of the funds and make it harder for reporting entities to identify suspicious activity in a timely manner. These factors add hurdles to the detection and investigation of criminal activity by national authorities.

These indicators are based on more than 100 case studies collected by members of the FATF Global Network.

Read the entire document, download it here.

July 24, 2020 Illegal Wildlife Trade

The Financial Action Task Force (FATF) has conducted a new study to provide guidance to countries on measures they can take to combat money laundering from the illegal wildlife trade.

Wildlife traffickers exploit weaknesses in the financial and non-financial sectors, to move, hide and launder their proceeds, enabling further wildlife crimes and damaging financial integrity. One of the most effective ways to identify the broader criminal networks and take the profit out of this crime is to follow the financial trails of wildlife traffickers.

Despite the significant criminal gains involved, countries and private sector are not prioritizing efforts to trace and combat financial flows from this trade in line with risk.

To combat the financial flows from the illegal wildlife trade, countries should therefore as a priority:

  1. Identify and assess their money laundering risks relating to the illegal wildlife trade.
  2. Ensure that national laws and powers for law enforcement allow authorities to go after the finances of wildlife traffickers, and to pursue financial investigations.

Read more about Money Laundering and the Illegal Wildlife Trade

July 7, 2020 FATF on Stablecoins

This report sets out the FATF’s views on so-called Stablecoins following the G20 request to consider the anti-money laundering and counter-terrorism financing issues relating to so-called Stablecoins.

The FATF has identified potential risks which may require further action including in jurisdictions where weak or non-existent AML/CFT programs and so-called Stablecoins with decentralized governance structures and anonymous peer-to-peer transactions via unhosted wallets.

The FATF proposes that all jurisdictions implement the revised FATF Standards on virtual assets and VASPs. FATF also wants to review the implementation and impact of the revised Standards by June 2021 to consider whether further updates are necessary. This will include monitoring the risks posed by virtual assets, the virtual asset market, and proposals for arrangements with potential for mass-adoption that may facilitate anonymous peer-to-peer transactions.

The FATF says it will provide guidance for jurisdictions on so-called Stablecoins and virtual assets, as part of a broader update of its Guidance. This will set out in more detail how AML/CFT controls apply to so-called Stablecoins, including the tools available to jurisdictions to address the ML/TF risks posed by anonymous peer-to-peer transactions via unhosted wallets.

The organization will also enhance the international framework for VASP supervisors to co-operate, share information, and strengthen their capabilities, in order to develop a global network of supervisors to oversee these activities.

FATF says in order to support those actions, the G20 needs to lead by example and ensure they have implemented the revised FATF Standards and calls on all other jurisdictions to do the same.

Read the entire: FATF Report to G20 on So-called Stablecoins

July 7, 2020 Virtual Assets and VASPs

This report sets out the findings of the 12-month review undertaken by the FATF to measure how jurisdictions and the private sector have implemented the revised Standards.

The FATF has completed a review of the implementation of its revised Standards on virtual assets and virtual asset service providers (VASPs); 12 months after the FATF finalized these amendments. The June 2019 revisions to the FATF Standards clearly placed anti-money laundering and counter-terrorism financing (AML/CFT) requirements on virtual assets and virtual asset service providers. The FATF also agreed to undertake a 12-month review by June 2020 to measure how jurisdictions and the private sector have implemented the revised Standards, as well as monitoring for any changes in the typologies, risks and the market structure of the virtual assets sector.

This report sets out the findings of the review. The report reviews the implementation of the revised Standards and sets out:

  • How money laundering and terrorism financing risks and the virtual asset market have changed since June 2019);
  • Jurisdictions’ progress in implementing the revised Standards;
  • The private sector’s progress in implementing the revised Standards, including the development of technical solutions for the implementation of the travel rule;
  • Issues identified with the revised FATF Standards and Guidance; and
  • FATF’s next steps regarding virtual assets.

Read the 12 Month Review of Revised FATF Standards - Virtual Assets and VASPs

June 30, 2020 High-Risk Jurisdictions

High-risk jurisdictions have significant strategic deficiencies in their regimes to counter money laundering, terrorist financing, and financing of proliferation, according to the FATF.

For all countries identified as high-risk, the FATF calls on all members and urges all jurisdictions to apply enhanced due diligence (EDD), and in the most serious cases, countries are called upon to apply counter-measures to protect the international financial system from the ongoing money laundering, terrorist financing, and proliferation financing risks emanating from the country.

On 28 April 2020, the FATF decided on a general pause in the review process for the list of high-risk jurisdictions subject to a call for action. Therefore, please refer to the list of High-Risk Jurisdictions subject to a Call for Action adopted in February 2020. While the statement may not necessarily reflect the most recent status in Iran and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea's AML/CFT regime, the FATF’s call for action on these high-risk jurisdictions remains in effect.

Read the report on High-Risk Jurisdictions subject to a Call for Action

Jun 30, 2020  Increased Monitoring

Jurisdictions under increased monitoring are actively working with the FATF to address strategic deficiencies in their regimes to counter money laundering, terrorist financing, and proliferation financing.

When the FATF places a jurisdiction under increased monitoring, it means the country has committed to resolve swiftly the identified strategic deficiencies within agreed timeframes and is subject to increased monitoring. This list is often externally referred to as the ‘grey list’.

On 28 April, the FATF decided on a general pause in the review process for the list of jurisdictions under increased monitoring.

The FATF continues to identify additional jurisdictions, on an on-going basis, that have strategic deficiencies in their regimes to counter money laundering, terrorist financing, and proliferation financing. A number of jurisdictions have not yet been reviewed by the FATF and FSRBs.

Read about the Jurisdictions under Increased Monitoring

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